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Your regular update for technical and industry information

Canada: Health Canada further explains the consumer products containing lead regulations

JANUARY 2022 - ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS, HARDLINES, SOFTLINES, TOYS AND CHILDREN'S PRODUCTS

Health Canada has recently issued a notice informing interested parties regarding the compliance of Consumer Products Containing Lead Regulations (CPCLR)1. The notice re-addresses the lead content requirements of certain consumer products and provides further guidance for test methods. 
 
The Regulations requires that lead content do not exceed 90 mg/kg in each accessible part of the following five categories of consumer products:

1. “A product that is brought into contact with the user’s mouth during normal use, except for 

 i. a kitchen utensil, or

   ii. a product that is subject to the Glazed Ceramics and Glassware Regulations.”

Some examples of consumer products that are within the scope include: 

  • Pacifiers and teethers
  • Sports mouthpieces and mouth guards
  • Drinking aids and vessels

2. “Any clothing or clothing accessory that is intended for use by a child under 14 years of age.”

  Some examples that are within the scope include: 

  • Wearing apparel like sleepwear, daywear, jackets
  • Footwear
  • Headwear such as hats and bonnets
  • Accessories such as
    • Neckties, belts, and suspender
    • Gloves and muffs
    • Shawls and scarves
    • Lanyards, socks, and stockings
    • Buttons and other attachments

3. “A product that is intended for use in learning or play (a toy) by a child under 14 years of age.”

Some examples that are within the scope include:

  • Children’s toys
  • Children’s role-playing products 
  • Products intended to be used for learning purposes, such as pencils, erasers, and rulers.

4. “A book or similar printed product that is intended for a child under 14 years of age, except if it is 

i. printed on paper or cardboard, and

ii. printed and bound in a conventional manner using conventional materials."

Some examples that are within the scope include books made of materials such as textile, plastic, or metal.

 

5. “A product whose primary purpose is to facilitate the relaxation, sleep, hygiene, carrying or transportation of a child under four years of age.” 

Some examples that are within the scope include:

  • Childcare articles and bath accessories 
  • Nursery products such as
     
    • Cribs, cradles, and bassinets
    • Strollers
    • High chairs
    • Swings
    • Baby carriers
    • Car seats
    • Changing tables 

Health Canada uses several test methods2 to test consumer products for total lead content. However, test methods used by Health Canada are not mandatory. They are provided to industry and private laboratories for those who might not have a test method readily available.  

 

[1]  Consumer Products Containing Lead Regulations, SOR/2018-83 

[2]  Product Safety Laboratory Chemistry Methods 

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